College of Education and Liberal Arts

English

The English Program at Texas A&M University-Texarkana

I. Bachelor’s Degrees in English

The Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees in English provide students with a strong background in English and American literature. Students must take two semesters of world literature at the sophomore level. The core of the B.A. and B.S. programs in English consists of four required survey courses, two in American literature (English 441/442) and two in English literature (English 471/472). Other required courses for English majors are English 424: History and Grammar of English, which provides students with an understanding of the origin and development of the English language and a survey of grammatical approaches to the language, and English 312: Shakespeare, which offers a detailed look at some of the major works of this important author. Optional courses, such as English 430: Images of Women in Literature, English 305 and 306, Children’s Literature I and II, and the genre courses English 450: Poetry, Drama, Short Story, and International Literature allow students to customize their degree plans. English majors also participate in a capstone course during the semester they graduate.

Major in English

In accordance with Texas Education Code, Chapter 61, Subchapter S, each general academic institution shall design and implement a core curriculum, including specific courses composing the curriculum of no less than 42 lower-division semester credit hours. The following Core Curriculum is required by A&M-Texarkana for English majors.

Core Curriculum/General Education

Eng 1301 Composition and Rhetoric I

Eng 1302 Composition and Rhetoric II

3 SCH: Eng 2332 World Literature I or Eng 2333 World Literature II

Hist 1301 History of U.S. to 1877

Hist 1302 History of U.S. from 1877

Govt 2305 American Government

Govt 2306 State and Local Government

3 SCH from:

Psychology 2301, Sociology 1301, Geography 1302 or 1303, or Economics 2301

3 SCH from:

College Algebra or equivalent

3 SCH from:

Arts 1301 Art Appreciation

Arts 1303 Art History Survey I

Musi 1301 Fundamentals of Music

Musi 1306 Music Appreciation

Dram 1310 Introduction to the Theatre

Dram 2361 Theatre History I

3 SCH from:

Spch 1315 Public Speaking I

Spch 1321 Business and Professional Speaking

6-8 SCH from:

Biology, Physical Science

3 SCH from:

Bcis 1305 Business Computer Application

Or

Cosc 1301 Introduction to Computer Science

Total Core Curriculum 42 SCH

Major: English

Eng 1301 Composition and Rhetoric I (from Core Curriculum)

Eng 1302 Composition and Rhetoric II (from Core Curriculum)

Eng 2332 World Literature I

Eng 2333 World Literature II

Eng 312 Shakespeare

Eng 424 History and Grammar of the English Language

Eng 441 Advanced Survey of American Literature to 1865

Eng 442 Advanced Survey of American Literature after 1865

Eng 471 Advanced Survey of British Literature to 1800

Eng 472 Advanced Survey of British Literature after 1800

Eng 491 Capstone in English Studies (1 hour)

9 SCH from:

Eng 430 Images of Women in Literature

Eng 450 Studies in Genre (may repeat when topics vary)

Eng 489 Individual Study (approved by advisor)

Eng 497 Special Topics

Eng 305 Children’s Literature I

Or

Eng 306 Children’s Literature II (Children’s Literature limited to 3 SCH in major.)

Total Hours in major: 40 SCH (9 hours from Core and other requirements)

Other Requirements

Eng 340 Advanced Expository Writing

IS 395 Living in the 21st Century

12 SCH in the same foreign language for the B.A. in English

Minor: Minimum of 18 SCH

Must choose a minor from Arts and Sciences, Behavioral Sciences or Business Administration.

Total Hours for Degree: 126 SCH

Bachelor’s degree requirements include the following minimums: 60 SCH transfer credit, 54 SCH upper-division credit, and 30 SCH in resident course work.

All undergraduate students majoring in English are required to take the Major Field Exam prior to graduation.

II. Certifications in English Language Arts and Reading

In addition to receiving the B.A. or B.S. in English, students may elect to be certified in two teaching fields: English Language Arts and Reading (grades 4-8) or English Language Arts and Reading (grades 8-12).

A. Certification Programs in English Language Arts and Reading (4-8)

General Education/Core

Eng 1301 Composition and Rhetoric I

Eng 1302 Composition and Rhetoric II

Eng 2332 World Literature I or Eng 2333 World Literature II

Hist 1301 History of the US to 1877

Hist 1302 History of the US from 1877

Govt 2305 American Government

Govt 2306 State & Fed Constitution

Science:

Biol 1404 Intro to Life Sciences I

Biol 1405 Intro to Life Sciences II

Phys 1415 Physical Science I

Math:

Math 1314 College Algebra

Math 1350 Fundamentals of Math I

Math 1351 Fundamentals of Math II

3 SCH from: Computer Sci

Bcis 1305 Bus Computer Applications

Or Cosc 1301 Intro to Computers

3 SCH from: Fine Arts

Mus 1300 Foundations of Music

Musi 1301 Fundamentals of Music

Arts 1301 Art Appreciation

Arts 1303 Art History Survey

Speech 3 SCH

Spch 1321 Business and Professional Speech

Behavioral Science

Psyc 2308 Child Development

Major: English

Eng 1301 Composition and Rhetoric I (from Core Curriculum)

Eng 1302 Composition and Rhetoric II (from Core Curriculum)

Eng 2332 World Literature

Eng 2333 World Literature

Eng 305 Children’s Literature I

Eng 306 Children’s Literature II

Eng 312 Shakespeare

Eng 340 Advanced Expository Writing

Eng 424 History and Grammar of the English Language

Eng 441 Advanced Survey of American Literature to 1865

Eng 442 Advanced Survey of American Literature after 1865

Eng 471 Advanced Survey of British Literature to 1800

Eng 472 Advanced Survey of British Literature after 1800

Eng 491 Capstone in English Studies (1 hour)

3 SCH from:

Eng 340 Images of Women in Literature

Eng 450 Studies in Genre (may repeat when topics vary)

Eng 497 Special Topics

Eng 489 Individual Study

Total Hours in major: 43 (12 hours from Core and Other Requirements)

Other requirements:

Comm 350 Adv Technological Comm.

Sped 410 Intro to Individuals w/Except.

IS 395 Living in the 21st Century

3 hour transfer elective

Professional Development and Education Course Requirements

Reading 340 Overview and Strategies I

Reading 342 Diagnostic Teaching of Reading

Reading 343 Reading Beyond Primary Grades

Reading 344 Reading Comprehension

Ed 321 Effective Teaching & Evaluation

Ed 434 Classroom Management and Teaching Strategies

Ed 435 Curriculum

Ed 492 (6 SCH) Resident Teaching 4-8

Sped 418 Inclusion Strategies and Techniques

Total Hours for Degree: 130 SCH

B. Certification: English Language Arts and Reading (8-12)

Core Curriculum/General Education

Eng 1301 Composition & Rhetoric I

Eng 1302 Composition & Rhetoric II

Eng 2332 World Literature I or Eng 2333 World Literature II

Hist 1301 History of the US to 1877

Hist 1302 History of the US from 1877

Govt 2305 American Govt

Govt 2306 State & Fed Govt

Science:

8 sch Biol

4 sch Sci/Chem

Math:

Math 1314 College Algebra

3 SCH Computer Sci from:

Bcis 1305 Bus Computer Applications

Or

Cosc 1301 Intro to Computers


6 SCH Fine Arts from:

Musi 1300 Foundations of Music

Musi 1301 Fundamentals of Music

Musi 1306 Music Appreciation

Arts 1301 Art Appreciation

Arts 1303 Art History Survey

Arts 1313 Foundations of Art

Behavior Science:

Psyc 2301 Intro to Psyc

3 SCH Speech from:

Spch 1315 Public Speaking I

Spch 1316 Public Speaking II

Spch 1342 Voice & Phonetics

Spch 2341 Oral Interpretations

Major: English

Eng 1301 Composition and Rhetoric I (from Core Curriculum)

Eng 1302 Composition and Rhetoric II (from Core Curriculum)

Eng 2332 World Literature

Eng 2333 World Literature

Eng 312 Shakespeare

Eng 424 History and Grammar of the English Language

Eng 340 Advanced Expository Writing

Eng 441 Advanced Survey of American Literature to 1865

Eng 442 Advanced Survey of American Literature after 1865

Eng 450 Studies in Genre

Eng 471 Advanced Survey of British Literature to 1800

Eng 472 Advanced Survey of British Literature after 1800

Eng 491 Capstone in English Studies (1 hour)

6 SCH from:

Eng 430 Images of Women in Literature

Eng 450 Studies in Genre (may repeat when topics vary)

Eng 497 Special Topics

Eng 489 Individual Study

Total Hours in major: 40 SCH (9 hours from the Core)

Other Requirements:

Comm 350 Adv Technological Communication

Sped 410 Intro to Individuals w/Except

IS 395 Living in the 21st Century

3sh Transfer Electives

2sh UD or LD Electives

Professional Development and Education Course Requirements:

Psyc 2308 Child Development

Ed 321 Effective Teaching & Evaluation

Ed 434 Classroom Mgt & Teaching Strategies

Ed 435 Curriculum

Ed 493 (6 SCH) Resident Teaching

Rdg 340 Overview & Strategies I

Rdg 343 Reading Beyond Primary Grades

Rdg 344 Reading Comprehension

Total Hours for Degree: 126 SCH

III. Master’s Degree in English

The Master of Arts in English offers students courses in literature, linguistics, and composition. The degree requires English 595: Research Literature and Techniques and 24 semester credit hours in English, at least half of which must be in literature courses. Additionally, students choose either English 518: Thesis or English 575: Current Issues in English Studies, the capstone course. In English 518, students write a formal thesis (6 semester hours credit) and in English 575 they write and formally present two major papers (3 semester hours credit). Students who choose the thesis option, must take 3 SCH in an approved elective while the non-thesis option requires 6 SCH in approved electives.

Course Description

Undergraduate Courses in English

Courses are three semester hours unless otherwise noted.

305 Children’s Literature I.A survey of the history of children’s books, books for very young children, picture books and illustrators, short fiction, folk tales, fables, myths and epics, historical fiction and biography.

306 Children’s Literature II. A study of realistic fiction, fantasy, poetry and informational books for young adult readers

312 Shakespeare. A study of the author’s plays with special attention devoted to major and better-known works

340 Advanced Expository Writing. Through guided practice, students develop the ability to write prose that informs and persuades. While they draft, revise, and edit a series of essays, students apply strategies for writing with effective organization and style. The course also demands careful reading and discussion of model essays and articles drawn from a diverse selection of published authors. Prerequisites: Eng 1301 and 1302.

424 History and Grammar of the English Language. Topics include the basic features of human language, a historical study of English, and a study of English phonology, morphology, and syntax.

430 Images of Women in Literature. A study of the various images of women in literature with an emphasis on the twentieth century.

441 Advanced Survey of American Literature I. A study of the development of American literature from its beginnings to the late nineteenth century.

442 Advanced Survey of American Literature II. A study of the development of American literature from the late nineteenth century to the present.

450 Studies in Genre. Advanced study of one of the following literary genres: (A) Short Story, (B) Poetry, (C) Drama, (D) International Literature. May be repeated when topics vary.

471 Advanced Survey of British Literature I. The development of English literature from its beginnings to 1800.

471 Advanced Survey of British Literature II. The development of English literature from 1800 to the present.

489 Individual Study. Individual instruction. May be repeated when topics vary.

491 Capstone in English Studies (1 hour). This course provides a review of English studies with emphasis on critical approaches to literature, literary terminology, and the characteristics and major writers of literary periods. Prerequisite: to be taken during the final semester of the bachelor’s degree program in English.

497 Special Topics. Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary. Special courses designed to cover areas of special interest (1-3 hours).

Graduate Courses in English

518 Thesis. This is the culminating course for students selecting the thesis-option of the M.A. in English. Students write a traditional thesis and present it to the English faculty. Permission of the instructor is required. (6 SCH)

555 Linguistics. Introduction to principles of how language develops, changes and functions. Course focuses on the differences among world languages, the history of the English language, and analysis of modern English phonology, morphology, and syntax (sound, units of meaning, word order).

570 Strategies in Composition. While reading recent studies of the composing process, students evaluate strategies for teaching composition, including remedial and creative writing. In addition, each student researches an area of special interest within the field of composition studies, writes a review of this research, and presents a summary of finding in an oral presentation to the class. Prerequisite: This class must be taken concurrently with Eng 571 and requires permission of the instructor to enroll.

571 Improving Students' Writing in the Schools . Students analyze current research in composition and writing across the curriculum, with special emphasis upon the theoretical approach developed by the National Writing Project. Further, after researching an area of special interest, each student applies theoretical principles by developing a unit of instruction and presenting a demonstration lesson. This course must be taken in tandem with ENG 570; permission of instructor required to enroll.

572 Readings in Composition. While reading books and articles on writing and reading, students participate in a series of workshops offered by the East Texas Writing Project's teaching consultants, master teachers who have participated in the Summer Writing Institute and who have established a record of successful classroom teaching. Through exploratory writing, students re-examine their assumptions about the writing process and formulate written lesson plans that incorporate what they have learned about the reading and writing process.

575 Current Issues in English Studies. This is the capstone course for students selecting the non-thesis option of the Master of Arts in English. Students write two major papers and present them to the English faculty. Prerequisite: Enrollment limited to students in their final semester of the MA in English program. Permission of instructor required.

580 Seminar in Literature. Examination of an individual author or group of authors, the study of a literary theme, or the study of a particular genre. May be repeated when topics vary.

589 Individual Study. Individual instruction. May be repeated when topics vary.

595 Research Literature and Techniques. Review of research by scholars in selected areas of English language and literature with emphasis on critical approaches and research methodology. Students will demonstrate competence in research methodology by the investigation and formal reporting of a topic chosen in consultation with the instructor.

597 Special Topics. Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary. Special courses designed to cover areas of special interest (1-3 hours).

On-Campus Organizations for English Majors

English Club

Established in the 1980s, the English Club is an active student group of twenty to thirty members who meet monthly. The club supports members’ interest in attending such activities as conferences, film festivals, poetry readings, and author presentations. For example, the club has sponsored trips to the following: Shakespeare Festivals in Montgomery, Alabama, and Dallas; Children’s Literature Conferences in Little Rock; Jack London Museum (Centenary College) and Norton Art Gallery in Shreveport; and the Kate Chopin Museum near Natchitoches. Additionally, the club has attended many productions sponsored by the Texarkana Regional Arts and Humanities Council (TRAHC). In 2006 Club members won first and third prize in TRAHC’s poetry contest. Recent service projects include raising funds to provide 50 children with educational supplies, donating $700 to Texarkana’s new community-built park—Kidtopia, and serving as poetry judges for the Barry Telford Unit of the Federal Correctional Institution.

Sigma Tau Delta:

Established in 1990, the Omicron Omega Chapter of the Sigma Tau Delta inducts about 10 new members yearly.

Texarkana Young Writers’ Program

The English program sponsors each summer the Texarkana Young Writers’ Program. For two weeks about 150 students, from second-graders through high school, spend their mornings writing with master teachers. Along with daily activities that make writing fun and interesting, students enjoy visits from children’s authors. The program culminates with a public presentation when students read from their writing to an audience of teachers and parents. Students submit their best writing to an anthology, which is published the following school year.

Faculty

Dr. Doris Davis